Whatcha Gonna Do With All Those Carbs?

Overwhelmed by your carb goal?

Feeling like there aren’t enough potatoes in the world to help you reach your macros at the end of the day?

Sometimes Ryan Gosling is here to help. But, in the rare occasion that he isn’t saving you an extra plate, we wanted to suggest some higher carb foods that will help move you closer to your goals.

When the only carb you know is sweet potatoes…

It’s time to make a change.

Put down the granola bars and Wonder bread sandwich, and let’s talk about all of the other delicious, whole food options that pack a carb punch. Without all of the processed crap.

Bean-based pastas

We, like the rest of the health foods world, are obsessed with bean-based pastas. These gluten-free, egg-free, vegetarian and vegan-friendly pasta options are an amazing source of not only carbohydrates but also protein. Some of our favorite kinds are made from edamame (soy beans), chickpeas, black beans. Find brands like Banza at almost every grocery store and even big box stores like Costco.

Rice

Did you know just how many different types of rice there are? White, brown, black, long grain, basmati, arborio, sushi, sticky… the list goes on! Each type of rice has it’s own nutritional profile and macronutrient break down, and all rice is NOT created equal.

Generally speaking, brown rice contains more fiber than white rice, meaning it keeps you full for longer. White rice, on the other hand, is more heavily processed to removed the bran and germ. This makes it easier to cook and chew but less nutrient dense than its darker colored cousins.

Quinoa

Quinoa is rice’s circular little cousin and packs a higher protein punch in exchange for a little bit less carbohydrate. But, don’t be fooled: these naturally gluten-free grains are crazy nutrient dense and are a great replacement for oats and glutenous products like pastas, breakfast cereals, and more. Still not convinced it’s worth your time? Check out some more info here.

Oatmeal

Oatmeal is an incredibly versatile and forgiving grain to cook with. Try it as overnight oats, mixed into any meat as a great gluten free binding alternative for a burger, or gently cook it on the stove top for a traditional breakfast (or lunch, or dinner….).

Opt for the least processed varieties with the most nutritional value like steel cut/Irish oats, or their finely ground brother, the stone ground oat. Avoid quick-cooking and instant oats, as they are the most highly processed. Though this makes them the easiest to cook, they are the most nutrient deficient choice. Learn more about each type of oatmeal, here.

Barley

A somewhat foreign grain to many people, barley has been used for centuries as a hearty, starchy base. Add it to salads, soups, stews, and more to increase the carb density of your meal. Barley comes with a nutty flavor and chewy texture, not to mention it packs 73g of carbohydrate per 100g!

Unsure how to use it in a recipe? Check out one of our favorite recipe generating websites, Yummly.

Dirty Foods and Dirty Minds: Why I Refuse to “Eat Clean”

When Food Becomes A Marker of Morality

For as long as I can remember, classifying food under a “Good” or “Bad” category has been an everyday habit. I couldn’t tell you the first time that I ever engaged in that kind of thought, but it has followed me into my 26th year on this planet, and I am vowing to take them out altogether.

When you claim to be “eating clean” you are automatically assigning morality to your eating actions and habits. You are deciding that “clean” food is “good” and “dirty” food is bad.

What is even considered clean? Is it foods that come from the earth? Is it foods that follow a ketogenic lifestyle? A high carbohydrate lifestyle? Foods that only include ingredients you can read? Vegan? Grass-fed meats? Organic vs. non organic? GMOs? Do you see what I’m getting at here?

This blog post from Mark’s Daily Apple gives us the break down in some of the simplest terms we can find:

“Unfortunately, if you scrutinize long and deep enough, just about any food choice can put you on the shame train. Seriously, at some point, we have to refuse to ride anymore”, because, quite frankly, it’s exhausting.

Clean eating is not scientific terminology. It is something that the fitness and food industries have come up with to convince you to buy their products because they are “guilt-free” or include “all natural” ingredients.

Morality is so intertwined in what we eat already, WHY do we want to add more pressure on ourselves to make the “right”, “good” choice?

I challenge you to eliminate those words from your vocabulary and reframe the way that you look at your food.

Food is neutral.

Take Action: Reframe

Think about how you refer to what you put in your body. Do you assign morality labels to certain foods? If you said no, you’re lying. We all do it, because we’ve all been conditioned to do it.

Reconsider the way you are thinking about your food.

 

Try and think: there is no such thing as a guilty pleasure or a dirty food. There are only pleasures, only foods. Some of them may be more nutrient-dense than others and made from whole ingredients (fact), but there are no morals. Eat the foods, and then move on.

When members come up to us and ask what they can be doing better for their diet, our default answer is to ask, “Are you eating whole foods and logging everything?”. Notice how we don’t suggest that you “start eating clean”. A whole food can be defined. A clean food cannot. A whole food does not have morality associated with it. A clean food does.

Ask yourself: Do you know the whole story?

Just as you would never shame another person based on the way that they look, why would you shame them based on the foods they eat?  Better yet, why would you do that to yourself?

Some people can afford to eat organically, others cannot. Feel better when you eat a lower carb, higher fat diet? You go, Glenn Coco! Eating gluten free because you’re sensitive to gluten or just because you think it’s a better way for you to live? Sounds great!

What works for you – biologically, financially, emotionally- might not work for everyone else. That is a fact.

Give yourself a break.

We have so many negative external factors pressuring us to be so many certain ways. Pressure to be skinny, strong, masculine, feminine. Eat only the absolute minimum amount to maintain a petite frame/eat as much as you can to be big and strong.

Why would you want to make yourself any more stressed out by telling yourself that you are a good or bad person by what you choose to eat? Give yourself a break from the world telling you to be a certain way because it makes them a profit.

 

 

Abs Are Made In the Kitchen: Eat Whole Foods and Log Everything

Ever heard that saying, “Abs are made in the kitchen”? Phrases like that don’t make such an impact just because they were pulled out of thin air! There’s a lot to be said about how what you eat impacts your performance in the gym as well as how you feel …