Reading Your Nutrition Label 101: Quick and Easy Tips!

Welcome to “Reading Your Nutrition Label 101”! You’ll find a nutrition label slapped on the side of every prepackaged food you can think of, and for good reason. Not only are they a government mandate, but they give us tons of information regarding the ingredients and nutrient density of the …

The Beginner’s Guide to Grocery Shopping on a Budget

As a macro counting beginner, we suggest making it as simple as possible by eating whole foods and logging everything. Eating whole foods doesn’t mean you actually have to shop at Whole Foods and spend your whole paycheck. (Though we are super fans of Amazon’s changes to the grocery chain).

Whole Foods or whole foods?

When we talk about eating whole, real foods, we are talking about primarily staying on the outside of the grocery store. If you think about the perimeter of the aisles, what foods do you find there? Produce, meat, dairy, and maybe your run of the mill olive bar. All of these foods come from the earth, and most of them are relatively unprocessed.

Stay towards the outside of the grocery store when you’re making your rounds. It’s an excellent way to keep yourself laser-focused on the foods that will give you the most nutritional bang for your buck.

We understand that some of these whole foods more expensive than the foods you can find inside the aisles. While that may be true, in this case inexpensive = cheap = lacking nutritional value.*

*Let us make a small exception here: There are certain foods that you’ll find in the aisles that are nutritionally dense, i.e. nut butters, beans, rice, oatmeal, and even salsas and sauces. *

I’m definitely not a beginner grocery shopper, but I don’t want to spend all of my money on food.

Lucky for you, you’re in the right spot! Check out our tips for making your grocery store trip as inexpensive and easy as possible.

Tip 1: Plan ahead and determine what you’ll eat during the week.

Figuring out your meals for the week will not only save you the headache when it comes down to crunch time, but will also save you big bucks. Simplify everything by knowing exactly what you need to buy to make your week’s meals and cut down on unnecessary spending!

Find a few functional, printable, and free meal planning templates here.

Tip 2: Write out a grocery list that includes strictly grocery items.

When you don’t have a list written out before you head out on your grocery trip, you are more likely to buy items you don’t need. If you plan ahead and figure out what you want to eat during the week (AKA Tip 1), making a list is much easier to manage.

Tip 3: Don’t be afraid to travel to different stores to find the best deals.

I’ve reached a point where I could shop with my eyes closed and still be able to pick up exactly what I need for the week. I find that certain stores are better and less expensive for certain items than others. Aldi, Trader Joe’s and Kroger seem to be my favorite three- give them a go! Their business models and coupons (like the additional savings you can find on the Kroger app) are wallet friendly.

Tip 4: Buy frozen vegetables and fruit and stock up on clearance items when you can. Avoid convenience foods.

Opt for foods that might take a little extra prep time on your end, like unpackaged greens or uncut fruit. Buying precut, prewashed or prepackaged produce often marks up the price.

Frozen veggies and fruit can be much cheaper than buying them fresh, and will last you longer. If you’re trying to buy organically, buying frozen is a great way to save some change. Not to mention, frozen produce keeps its nutritional profile for longer.

Don’t be afraid of the clearance section! If you’re planning on cooking, eating, or freezing a clearance-marked food within the next 24 hours or so, it is a wallet-friendly option. Obviously, if the meat or produce is looking a little sketchy (i.e. wilted, moldy, or grey), skip it.

Tip 5: Shop on a full stomach and when you’re not stressed out or tired.

When you’re hungry and tired, or hangry, you tend to gravitate towards highly palatable/highly processed foods. This is the case whether you’re shopping the aisles of the grocery store or the shelves in your pantry. If you have to go to the store while you’re feeling anything other than jovial, we recommend sticking to the stores that you know so you can get in and out quickly. Less distraction, less frustration, more happiness!

 

Whatcha Gonna Do With All Those Carbs?

Overwhelmed by your carb goal?

Feeling like there aren’t enough potatoes in the world to help you reach your macros at the end of the day?

Sometimes Ryan Gosling is here to help. But, in the rare occasion that he isn’t saving you an extra plate, we wanted to suggest some higher carb foods that will help move you closer to your goals.

When the only carb you know is sweet potatoes…

It’s time to make a change.

Put down the granola bars and Wonder bread sandwich, and let’s talk about all of the other delicious, whole food options that pack a carb punch. Without all of the processed crap.

Bean-based pastas

We, like the rest of the health foods world, are obsessed with bean-based pastas. These gluten-free, egg-free, vegetarian and vegan-friendly pasta options are an amazing source of not only carbohydrates but also protein. Some of our favorite kinds are made from edamame (soy beans), chickpeas, black beans. Find brands like Banza at almost every grocery store and even big box stores like Costco.

Rice

Did you know just how many different types of rice there are? White, brown, black, long grain, basmati, arborio, sushi, sticky… the list goes on! Each type of rice has it’s own nutritional profile and macronutrient break down, and all rice is NOT created equal.

Generally speaking, brown rice contains more fiber than white rice, meaning it keeps you full for longer. White rice, on the other hand, is more heavily processed to removed the bran and germ. This makes it easier to cook and chew but less nutrient dense than its darker colored cousins.

Quinoa

Quinoa is rice’s circular little cousin and packs a higher protein punch in exchange for a little bit less carbohydrate. But, don’t be fooled: these naturally gluten-free grains are crazy nutrient dense and are a great replacement for oats and glutenous products like pastas, breakfast cereals, and more. Still not convinced it’s worth your time? Check out some more info here.

Oatmeal

Oatmeal is an incredibly versatile and forgiving grain to cook with. Try it as overnight oats, mixed into any meat as a great gluten free binding alternative for a burger, or gently cook it on the stove top for a traditional breakfast (or lunch, or dinner….).

Opt for the least processed varieties with the most nutritional value like steel cut/Irish oats, or their finely ground brother, the stone ground oat. Avoid quick-cooking and instant oats, as they are the most highly processed. Though this makes them the easiest to cook, they are the most nutrient deficient choice. Learn more about each type of oatmeal, here.

Barley

A somewhat foreign grain to many people, barley has been used for centuries as a hearty, starchy base. Add it to salads, soups, stews, and more to increase the carb density of your meal. Barley comes with a nutty flavor and chewy texture, not to mention it packs 73g of carbohydrate per 100g!

Unsure how to use it in a recipe? Check out one of our favorite recipe generating websites, Yummly.

Discover The Key To Tracking Your Macros in Three Minutes

Hey you. Start here.

Keep your brain clear, your scale visible, and your belly full! Tracking doesn’t have to be complicated or intimidating. Take 3 minutes today and read about some of our top Do’s and Don’ts to tracking your macros.

Do:

Keep your food scale on the counter.

Out of sight, out of mind! Keep your food scale out and visible as a reminder to weigh and measure when you’re at home. It is the most accurate way to figure out how much you’re eating!

Track everything you eat.

If you don’t, you are defeating the whole purpose of tracking your macros in the first place. The beauty of tracking is being able to eat whatever you want (no guilt here!), but within a portion-controlled amount.

Choose nutrient-dense foods.

9 times out of 10, choosing a nutrient-dense food (for example, a piece of fruit), will pack LESS macronutrients than choosing the less nutrient-dense food (like a scoop of ice cream). That means, if you love to eat in volume, you can eat MORE for LESS. Win, win.

Communicate with your coach.

If you’re constantly starving, having trouble hitting your carbs, or generally feeling unmotivated, your coach is here to help you! Communication is key, and we promise, we’ve been there before. Let us help you work through it.

Don’t:

Beat yourself up if you aren’t perfect.

There is no reason for you to forget about the progress you’ve made if you aren’t perfect for a day, or even a week. Be gracious with yourself and remember that this is a lifestyle change, and it takes time. Not to mention, that added pressure of being perfect may actually be detrimental to your goals. Stress = Counterproductive.

Restrict.

Restriction of certain food groups or individual foods will only cause cravings, and ultimately binges (unless you are actually sensitive/allergic to these foods). Let yourself live! You can have your cake AND eat it too. As long as you track it.

Looking for more tracking tips? My Fitness Pal suggests these 10 for tracking newbies.

Dirty Foods and Dirty Minds: Why I Refuse to “Eat Clean”

When Food Becomes A Marker of Morality

For as long as I can remember, classifying food under a “Good” or “Bad” category has been an everyday habit. I couldn’t tell you the first time that I ever engaged in that kind of thought, but it has followed me into my 26th year on this planet, and I am vowing to take them out altogether.

When you claim to be “eating clean” you are automatically assigning morality to your eating actions and habits. You are deciding that “clean” food is “good” and “dirty” food is bad.

What is even considered clean? Is it foods that come from the earth? Is it foods that follow a ketogenic lifestyle? A high carbohydrate lifestyle? Foods that only include ingredients you can read? Vegan? Grass-fed meats? Organic vs. non organic? GMOs? Do you see what I’m getting at here?

This blog post from Mark’s Daily Apple gives us the break down in some of the simplest terms we can find:

“Unfortunately, if you scrutinize long and deep enough, just about any food choice can put you on the shame train. Seriously, at some point, we have to refuse to ride anymore”, because, quite frankly, it’s exhausting.

Clean eating is not scientific terminology. It is something that the fitness and food industries have come up with to convince you to buy their products because they are “guilt-free” or include “all natural” ingredients.

Morality is so intertwined in what we eat already, WHY do we want to add more pressure on ourselves to make the “right”, “good” choice?

I challenge you to eliminate those words from your vocabulary and reframe the way that you look at your food.

Food is neutral.

Take Action: Reframe

Think about how you refer to what you put in your body. Do you assign morality labels to certain foods? If you said no, you’re lying. We all do it, because we’ve all been conditioned to do it.

Reconsider the way you are thinking about your food.

 

Try and think: there is no such thing as a guilty pleasure or a dirty food. There are only pleasures, only foods. Some of them may be more nutrient-dense than others and made from whole ingredients (fact), but there are no morals. Eat the foods, and then move on.

When members come up to us and ask what they can be doing better for their diet, our default answer is to ask, “Are you eating whole foods and logging everything?”. Notice how we don’t suggest that you “start eating clean”. A whole food can be defined. A clean food cannot. A whole food does not have morality associated with it. A clean food does.

Ask yourself: Do you know the whole story?

Just as you would never shame another person based on the way that they look, why would you shame them based on the foods they eat?  Better yet, why would you do that to yourself?

Some people can afford to eat organically, others cannot. Feel better when you eat a lower carb, higher fat diet? You go, Glenn Coco! Eating gluten free because you’re sensitive to gluten or just because you think it’s a better way for you to live? Sounds great!

What works for you – biologically, financially, emotionally- might not work for everyone else. That is a fact.

Give yourself a break.

We have so many negative external factors pressuring us to be so many certain ways. Pressure to be skinny, strong, masculine, feminine. Eat only the absolute minimum amount to maintain a petite frame/eat as much as you can to be big and strong.

Why would you want to make yourself any more stressed out by telling yourself that you are a good or bad person by what you choose to eat? Give yourself a break from the world telling you to be a certain way because it makes them a profit.

 

 

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Alcohol: Is it a Macro and How To Count It?

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The Importance of Post-Workout Carbs and Protein

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